Statistics

About Us

Founded in 2003, Treasures is the first and only organization of its kind in the Los Angeles area and one of the few survivor-led organizations in the nation.

We are located in the heart of the Adult Industry Capital of the World, in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles.  90% of all legal porn world-wide is filmed, distributed, and or manufactured here.

 

SEX INDUSTRY STATS

 


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PREVALENCE

  • There are more women are employed by the sex industry than any other time in history[i].
  • There are more strip clubs in the United States than any other nation in the world[ii].
  • Hollywood releases 11,000 adult movies per year – more than 20 times the mainstream movie production[iii].
  • At 13.3 billion, the 2006 revenues of the sex and porn industry in the U.S. are bigger than the NFL, NBA and Major League Baseball combined[iv].
  • Worldwide sex industry sales for 2006 are reported to be $97 billion. To put this in perspective, Microsoft, who sells the operating system used on most of the computers in the world (in addition to other software) reported sales of 44.8 billion in 2006 [iv].
  • Every second – $3,075.64 is being spent on pornography [iv].
  • “The porn industry employs an excess of 12,000 people in California. In California alone the porn industry pays over $36 million in taxes every year[v].”
  • Human trafficking is the second largest global organized crime today, generating approximately 31.6 billion USD each year. Specifically, trafficking for sexual exploitation generates 27.8 billion USD per year[vi].
  • There 1.39 million victims of commercial sexual servitude worldwide [vi].

Prevalence in the Church

  • Promise Keeper men who viewed pornography in last week-53%
  • 33% of clergy admitted to having visited a sexually explicit Web site. Of those who had visited a porn site, 53% had visited such sites “a few times” in the past year, and 18% visit sexually explicit sites between a couple of times a month and more than once a week[vii].
  • Out of 81 pastors surveyed (74 males 7 female), 98% had been exposed to porn; 43% intentionally accessed a sexually explicit website[viii].
  • In March of 2002 Rick Warren’s (author of the Purpose Driven life) Pastors.com website conducted a survey on porn use of 1351 pastors: 54% of the pastors had viewed Internet pornography within the last year, and 30% of these had visited within the last 30 days.

 

WOMEN

Research related to women working in various aspect of the sex industry is telling.  Such research indicates that women working in the sex industry are faced with higher rates

  • drug addictions[ix],
  • sexually transmitted diseases[x],
  • violent assaults[xi], and
  • mental health problems[xii] such as Depression and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder than the general population.


Between 66% to 90% of women in the sex industry were sexually abused as children[xiii].

70% of interviewees in a study by Silbert and Pines noted that childhood sexual abuse had an influence on their entry into prostitution[xiv].

 

Women in the sex industry experience Post Traumatic Stress Disorder at rates equivalent

to veterans of combat war[xv].

Diagnosis of PTSD per country of prostituted respondents:

• Canada: 74%

• Colombia: 86%

• Germany: 60%

• Mexico: 54%

• South Africa: 75%

• Thailand: 58%

• Turkey: 66%

• USA: 69%

• Zambia: 71%

***Diagnosis of PTSD for combat war veterans: 69%

 

89% of women in the sex industry said they wanted to escape, but had no other means for survival [xv].

73% of women in prostitution have been raped more than five times. vi

70% of females who are trafficked are trafficked into the commercial sex industry[xvi] (This includes Porn, Strip Clubs, and massage parlors in the US) –

Women in the sex industry face a myriad of issues that impact their physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being. Many feel desperately isolated and alone. Because their hurts and needs are multi-faceted, the approach to assisting them in the recovery process needs to be holistic as well.

 VIOLENCE AND AGGRESSION AGAINST WOMEN IN PORN

A content analysis of the 50 best-selling adult videos revealed that across all scenes:

  • 3,376 verbal and/or physically aggressive acts were observed.
  • On average, scenes had 11.52 acts of either verbal of physical aggression, ranging from none to 128.
  • 48 percent of the 304 scenes analyzed contained verbal aggression, while more than 88 percent showed physical aggression.
  • 72 percent of aggressive acts were perpetrated by men.
  • 94 percent of aggressive acts were committed against women. [xvii]

MENTAL HEALTH OF WOMEN IN PORN

A cross-sectional study based on the California Women’s Health Survey did a comparison of the mental health of female adult performers and other young women in California.  Here is what their research revealed.

                                                            Women in porn                   Women NOT in porn

Met criteria for depression                          33%                                        13%

Child victims of forced sex                           37%                                        13%

Lived in poverty                                            24%                                        12%

Placed in foster care                                    21%                                        4%

Lived in poverty in past 12 months              50%                                        36%

Experienced Domestic Violence                   34%                                        6%

in past 12 months

Experienced forced sex as adults                 27%                                        9%

 

THE DEMAND

  • 70% of men ages 18-28 regularly view porn sites (XXXChurch.com)
  • U.S. adults who regularly visit Internet pornography websites-40 million [iv].
  • 1 of 3 visitors to all adult websites are women [iv].
  • 9.4 million women access adult websites every month [iv].

FAMILIES

  • 47% of families say pornography is a “problem” in their home[xviii].
  • Excessive interest in online porn contributed to more than ½ of all divorce cases in 2002 according to attorneys who attended conference for American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers
  • 41 percent of surveyed adults admitted they felt less attractive due to their partner’s pornography use[xix].
  • 77% of online visitors to adult content sites are male. Their average age is 41 and they have an annual income of $60,000. 46% are married[xx].

CHILDREN

  • 116,000 searches for child porn every day
  • Average Age Child 1st sees porn: 11 years old [xxi]

 

STRIP CLUB STATISTICS ACCORDING TO THE BUREAU OF LABOR STATISTICS

Strip Club Statistics
Global strip club annual revenue $75 billion
US strip club annual revenue $3.1 billion
California strip club annual revenue $1 billion
Number of strip clubs in the US 4,000
Estimate number of strippers employed by US strip clubs 400,000
City with the most strip clubs per 100,000 residents (Springfield, Oregon) 9.3
Average yearly earnings for a stripper $125,000

The State of California brings in 1/3 of the annual strip club revenue for the entire United States!

 

HUMAN TRAFFICKING TRENDS IN THE U.S.

http://iamatreasure.com/2013/11/human-trafficking-trends-in-the-united-states/

SEX INDUSTRY SURVIVOR STORIES

http://iamatreasure.com/our-stories/

List of Works Cited

[i] Stripped – Inside the Lives of Exotic Dancers, Barton

[ii] Stripped – Inside the Lives of Exotic Dancers, Barton

[iii] LA Times Magazine, 2002

[iv] Internet Filter Review http://internet-filter-review.toptenreviews.com/internet-pornography-statistics.html

[v] Bill Lyon, a former lobbyist for the defense industry turned lobbyist for porn, as quoted by CBS News November 2003.

[vi] United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, 2009, Trafficking in Persons: Global Patterns, Available: http://www.unodc.org/documents/human-trafficking/Global_Report_on_TIP.pdf

[vii] Christianity Today survey in 2000

[viii] National Coalition survey of pastors, Seattle, April 2000.

[ix] Hutchinson, S. J., Gore, S. M., Taylor, A., Goldberg, D. J., Frischer, M. (2000).  Extent and contributing factors of drug expenditure of injectors in Glasgow: Multi-site city-wide cross-sectional study.  British Journal of Psychiatry, 176(2), 166-172.

Norton-Hawk, M. (2001).  The counterproductivity of incarcerating female street prostitutes.  Deviant Behavior:  An Interdisciplinary Journal, 22, 403-417.

Potterat, J. J., Rothenberg, R. B., Muth, S., Q., Darrow, W.W., Phillips-Plummer, L. (1998).  Pathways to prostitution: The chronology of sexual and drug abuse milestones.  Journal of Sex Research, 35(4), 333-340.

Weisberg, K. D. (1985).  Children of the night:  A study of adolescent prostitution.  Lexington, MA & Toronto:  D.C. Heath and Company.

Young, A. M., Boyd, C., Hubbell, A. (2000).  Prostitution, drug use, and coping with psychological distress.  Journal of Drug Issues, 30(4), 789-800.

[x] Gupta, G. R., Weiss, E. & Wheland, D. (1996).  Women and AIDs:  Building a new HIV prevention strategy.  New York: Oxford.

Maia, Wojcicki, J., & Malala, J. (2001).  Condom use, power, and HIV/AIDS risk:  Sex-workers bargain for survival in Hillbrow/Joubert Park?Berea, Johannesburg.  Social Science & Medicine, 53(1).

Mann, J. & Tarantola, D. (1996).  AIDs in the world II global dimensions, socila roots, & responses.  New York:  Oxford University Press.

Yates, G. L., MacKenzie, R. G; Pennbridge, J., & Swofford, A.  (1991).  A risk profile comparison of homeless youth involved in prostitution and homeless youth not involved.  Journal of Adolescent Health, 12(7), 545-548.

[xi] Bracey, D. H. (1982). The juvenile prostitute: Victim and offender Victimology, 8(3-4), 151-160.

Brener, L. & Pauw, I. (1998).  Sex work on the streets of Capetown.  Indicator, 13, 25-28.

Hobson, B. M. (1997).  Uneasy virtue:  The politics of prostitution and the American reform tradition.  New York: Basic.

Maia, Wojcicki, J., & Malala, J. (2001).  Condom use, power, and HIV/AIDS risk:  Sex-workers bargain for survival in Hillbrow/Joubert Park?Berea, Johannesburg.  Social Science & Medicine, 53(1).

Norton-Hawk, M. (2001).  The counterproductivity of incarcerating female street prostitutes.           Deviant Behavior:  An Interdisciplinary Journal, 22, 403-417.

Weisberg, K. D. (1985).  Children of the night:  A study of adolescent prostitution. Lexington, MA & Toronto:  D.C. Heath and Company.

[xii] Alegria, M., Vera, M., Freeman, D., Robles, R., Santos, M., & Rivera, C., (1994).  HIV infection, risk behaviors, and depressive symptoms among Puerto Rican sex workers.  American Journal of Public Health, 84(12), 2000-2002.

Chudakov, B., Ilian, K., & Belmaker, R. H. (2002).  The motivation & mental health of sex workers.  Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 28, 305-315.

Flowers, B. R. (1994).  The prostitution of women and girls.  North Carolina and London: McFarland.

Yates, G. L., MacKenzie, R. G; Pennbridge, J., & Swofford, A.  (1991).  A risk profile comparison of homeless youth involved in prostitution and homeless youth not involved.  Journal of Adolescent Health, 12(7), 545-548.

[xiii] Bracey, D. H. (1982). The juvenile prostitute: Victim and offender Victimology, 8(3-4), 151-160.

Harlan, S., Rogers, L. L. & Slattery, B. (1981).  Male and female adolescent prostitution: Huckleberry house sexual minority youth services project.  Washington D.C.:  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Norton-Hawk, M. (2001).  The counterproductivity of incarcerating female street prostitutes.  Deviant Behavior:  An Interdisciplinary Journal, 22, 403-417.

Silbert, M. H. (1980).  Sexual assault of prostitutes: Phase one.  Washington D.C.:  National Center for  the Prevention and Control of Rape, National Institute of Mental Health.

Weisberg, K. D. (1985).  Children of the night:  A study of adolescent prostitution.  Lexington, MA & Toronto:  D.C. Heath and Company.

[xiv] Silbert, M.H., & Pines, A.M. (1981). Sexual child abuse as an antecedent to prostitution. Child Abuse and Neglect 5:407-411.

Silbert, M.H., & Pines, A.M. (1983).  Early sexual exploitation as an influence in prostitution. Social Work 28:285-289.

[xv] Melissa Farley, from “Prostitution and Trafficking in Nine Countries: An Update on Violence and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder” www.prostitutionresearch.com

vi Melissa Farley, from “Prostitution and Trafficking in Nine Countries: An Update on Violence and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder” www.prostitutionresearch.com

[xvi] U.S. Department of Justice, Assessment of U.S. Government Activities to Combat Trafficking in Persons: 2004

[xvii] (Bridges, A., Wosnitzer, R., Scharrer, E., Sun, C., & Liberman, R. (in press).  Aggression and sexual behavior in best-selling pornography: A content analysis update. Violence Against Women.)

[xviii] Focus on the Family Poll, October 1, 2003

[xix] Marriage Related Research, Mark A. Yarhouse, Psy.D.  Christian Counseling Today, 2004 Vol. 12 No. 1.

[xx] Forrester Research Report, 2001

[xxi] According to “Social Costs of Porn” http://internetsafety101.org

 


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